Thursday, May 25, 2017

For those who’ve lost their political home, there’s hope

Every day, I go through certain news sources religiously. Part of it is for the sake of our news aggregator, but it’s also important for me to stay on top of political, religious, and cultural events to help the Federalist Party remain ahead of the news curve. RedState has always one of my daily sources and one story in particular sparked the need for a response.

J. Cal Davenport posted a story titled, “No Party Is Serious And I Feel Politically Homeless.” As a conservative, he feels like the Republican Party is losing its core, the Democratic Party continues to embrace a miserable ideology, and all other parties are failing and/or irrelevant.

I can appreciate this because it’s exactly where I was around this time last year. The GOP had been leaving me for a long time but I was just coming around to accepting it. The Democrats are… Democrats. I spent months looking into the other parties small and large and realized they all missed one major component: good strategy. That’s what prompted me to pursue building a new party. It’s what drove me to call people I respect to get counsel and rally support. In the end, this angst drove me to realize objectively we have a reason for hope.

The idea of a perfect storm has materialized. If I looked into building a new party three years ago, I’m fairly certain I would have concluded that we need to fix the GOP from within. If I waited a year or two before looking into it, I may have decided that getting into the political world would be fruitless. Whatever it was that pushed me to explore the possibilities at this moment in time, I count it as a blessing. What I’m seeing is a groundswell of support driven by an increasing number of people disenfranchised with their current political homes. Many conservatives are seeing their Grand Ol’ Party acting more like 90s-era Democrats while many evangelicals are quickly learning that values, ethics, and principles are negotiable within the modern Republican Party.

The Democrats are facing a similar dilemma. Contrary to popular belief on the right, there are plenty of Democrats who would never embrace socialism. There are Democrats who are pro-life. There are even Democrats who don’t believe in growing government. I know this for certain because I talk to them every day; over 20% of those inquiring about the party are current or former Democrats. It’s not just frustration with the leftward push towards communism their party seems to be making. Many, particularly minorities like me, say they were raised Democrat and could never allow themselves to become Republicans, but they love what they’re hearing from us about getting the government out of their lives.

As for other parties, our appeal is our strategy. From “boots and bytes” for growth to our focus on local elections first to our plan for holding representatives accountable, we’re opening eyes of many third-party enthusiasts. We’ve been told we seem to have a better grasp of how to move forward five-months since our formation than their parties have been able to muster after a quarter-century of failure.

I’d love to say with certainty that we’ll be successful, but certainty isn’t a luxury anyone has in this political atmosphere. I’d love to say we’re coming in at the right time since it seems like things are falling into place nicely, but it’s impossible to know if the nation can be set on the right course in time. All I can say for sure is that good things are happening and every effort is being put into this to give us the best chance possible. I’m not promising victory. I’m simply saying there are good reasons to not give up hope.



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Wednesday, May 24, 2017

The sacred rights of mankind

The founders had a clear understanding about and reverence for the source of our rights. They didn’t design the Constitution to give us these rights. They designed it to protect them from the machinations of men, particularly those in government. This is one of the biggest reasons the party is so clear in its philosophies towards these rights. We want to defend the Constitution because the Constitution is the only way to defend our freedoms.

The sacred rights of mankind are not to be rummaged for among old parchments or musty records. They are written, as with a sunbeam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the hand of the divinity itself; and can never be erased.



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While the GOP misses with millennials, the Federalist message is right on target

It’s no surprise that the Federalist Party is getting a ton of new members who feel the GOP has left them. What may be surprising is that a good number of the ones we’re seeing make the switch are millennials.

When we first started down the road of forming a new party, the majority of early adopters were over 35-years-old. Our message of reining in DC, defending freedoms, and protecting life were once associated with the Republican Party, but over the last few years it’s become more apparent that the party only invoked these ideas when they were campaigning. We knew we needed to craft a strong message to appeal to the younger generation. What we didn’t anticipate is that the message that resonated with long-time Republicans would also hit the mark with younger voters.

Today, nearly half of our new members are millennials.

According to Kristen Soltis Anderson, this isn’t the same old shift away from the GOP:

It’s been reported often and for many years that Republicans are losing younger people, but what is most shocking about the Pew study is the narrow window in which this wave of defections occurred. In the relatively short time frame of December 2015 to March 2017, nearly half of all young Republicans left their party at some point, with roughly a quarter bidding the GOP adieu for good.

No other group, by age or party, wavered so much or defected in such substantial numbers.

The Federalist Party represents a promise that the GOP has always made. The difference is that Republican leaders in recent years have debunked themselves by failing to keep these promises. They say things in opposition to Democrats during campaign season, then embrace big government ideas when they’re given control. Young (and old) people who want laser-focus on shrinking government are joining the Federalist Party en masse.

To understand why this is the case, we have to put aside certain stereotypes. Media is quick to point out when college students protest conservative speakers, but they hide the fact that there’s a strong counter-insurgency of small-government-minded students. They might not riot. They may have more respect for free speech than their left-wing counterparts, but their numbers are strong and their passions are often stronger. Moreover, the angst that many millennials are feeling stems from an emerging understanding that the federal government causes many of the problems they claim to fix. The internet and social media have allowed failures and political debacles to take on lives of their own. The realization that we need less government is why people like Ron Paul, Ted Cruz, and Ben Sasse have been so appealing to millennials.

Most Americans, when presented with the facts, can come to the conclusion that less interference from the federal government yields much better results. It’s nearly universal; returning power to the states, communities, and individuals solves problems much better than relying on overarching mandates, cumbersome regulations, and offensive laws decreed by DC. The rise of the Federalist Party is coming at the exact right moment in history.



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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

If California adopts single-payer, I’ll finally leave the state

It’s mildly ironic that on the 10th anniversary of me taking up residence in the state of California, I’m seriously considering moving my family out. It’s not the outrageous cost of living nor the left-leaning nature of the state even in the “conservative safe haven” of Orange County. Sacramento is now pushing for single-payer health care. If that makes it in, I’ll finally move out.

As is often the case with liberal ideas, the fantasy surrounding the proposal is so outrageous that many in the state will stick their heads in the sand (even further than they already do) and love on the idea while ignoring the consequences. They’re calling for free… everything: no copays or deductibles. This is why it has a chance of succeeding. People will hear that and instantly rejoice.

Of course, “free” is never free. You might be wondering how much this proposal will cost California tax-payers. The current budget is $183 billion. That’s a lot of money and it’s made possible by outrageously high taxes on residents and businesses. To make this single-payer plan work will require $400 billion per year. Yes, this plan will more than triple the current budget.

Let that sink in. I’ll wait.

Guy Benson sums it up nicely at Townhall:

If you’re craving a “fair” system that stifles innovation, rations care, limits access, creates lengthy wait lists for basic medical services, and has worse survival rates for serious conditions like cancer, single-payer is the way forward.  And even if that all sounds acceptable to you, good luck paying for it.

I’m not rich but my revenue is above average. Even so, I’d by crushed by further increases in state taxes. No thank you.

As Aaron Bandler noted on DailyWire:

California already faces a $1.6 billion budget deficit this year, but the state’s debt problems are actually much worse than that, as the state faces unfunded liabilities of almost a trillion dollars. Given that the Tax Foundation has already ranked California as having the sixth-highest tax rates in the nation, the ensuing tax rates from implementing a single-payer healthcare bill system would be even more onerous and cripple the state’s economy.

The problem with creating utopia is that reality eventually kicks in and the attempted utopia turns into a living nightmare, which is why states that have tried to implement single-payer have failed to do so. The price tag of the bill being put forward in the state senate suggests the same will be true for California.

The left is great at selling a dream. They’re like the junior high student council candidate who tells people how awesome it will be when they have Pepsi coming out of the water fountains. They’re in the business of making promises and blaming others for the consequences. No state exemplifies this better than California. I fear I may have to abandon the nice weather to find greener pastures soon.



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Federalism vs Statism is like the parkway vs the driveway

Have you ever wondered why we drive on a parkway and park in the driveway? It’s the type of question that just about everyone has been asked or seen in a Twitter feed for an up-and-coming comedian trying to get attention, but it’s also fairly legitimate. The same thing can he said about the differences between Federalism and Statism.

Federalism as a political philosophy embraces a balance between the states and federal governments. In the current atmosphere, we see an extreme imbalance in favor of the federal government, so proper Federalism pushes to rein in DC’s budget, bureaucracy, and power. Statism as a political philosophy believes in centralizing power in DC. The “state” in statism is actually the nation. This is why there’s sometimes confusion between the two philosophies. Statism favors the federal government while Federalism favors the states and individuals.

I addressed this in a post titled “Overcoming our biggest obstacle: The knowledge gap on what Federalism means.”

Our early adopters understood it and our exponentially expanded membership is well-aware of the need to rein in DC by dramatically reducing budget, bureaucracy, and power. It’s time to bring this understanding to the rest of America. We have to make them aware that balancing powers between the states and federal governments based upon Constitutional restraints is at the core of the Federalist Party’s mission.

This is where we need your help. We’re not going to get much of it from the education system and many in the media seem to lack the understanding necessary to communicate our perspectives, so the Federalist Party needs the grassroots to spread the word. We need every Federalist to know that our core principles are reining in government, defending freedoms, and protecting life.

For the Federalist Party to succeed, we must make sure as many people as possible are aware that true modern-day Federalism believes in balance which means we believe in limiting power in Washington DC.



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Sunday, May 21, 2017

The strength of the Constitution

Everyone knows Albert Einstein was arguably the sharpest mind to walk the earth in modern history. What many don’t realize is that his insights into culture, society, and politics were often just as profound as his understanding of physics. This quote is quite true and demonstrates an ideal that may never be achieved, but that we still should strive for as Americans blessed to be part of this great nation.

The strength of the Constitution lies entirely in the determination of each citizen to defend it. Only if every single citizen feels duty bound to do his share in this defense are the constitutional rights secure.



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Maybe Trump’s advisers are the problem

Trump supporters will say, “well, duh.” Trump detractors will say either (1) he shouldn’t have surrounded himself with Establishment morons and liberal manipulators, or (2) Trump would have made poor decisions regardless of his advisers.

It doesn’t behoove me to give the President the benefit of the doubt from a political perspective because all of Trump’s poor decisions bode well for the Federalist Party. However, as an American who puts country before party, I’m hopeful that a shakeup might be good enough to get him going in the right direction. Besides, if he shakes things up and continues to make poor decisions, the blame can be squarely and without a shred of doubt placed squarely on his shoulders.

The most recent observation of poor advisers comes in the form of one of the poorest, Reince Priebus. His latest egregious act was allegedly to bring in another Establishment tool from days past, John Boehner, to push Trump towards signing the Democrats’ dream spending package. According to Axios:

When the spending bill had been negotiated and finalized, White House chief of staff Reince Priebus phoned the former House Speaker John Boehner and told him the president doesn’t like how the negotiation came out and is thinking about vetoing the bill. Boehner has told associates that Priebus asked him if he could talk Trump into signing the spending bill. Boehner said he would.

Again, I’m not making excuses for Trump, but I’d prefer that he turn his ship back towards the right rather than continue his leftward lurch.

If he gets rid of Priebus, that would be a step in the right direction. From there, all he has to do is rid himself of McMaster, Tillerson, Kushner, Ivanka, and half of his senior staff. Then, at least, we might have a chance of this not being a third Democratic Presidential term.



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The Federalist Party fundraising is up and running

Whenever I talk to pundits and political pros, the first (and often second, third, and fourth) question they ask is about money. Having a passionate party with great ideas is one thing, but funding it is a whole other story. Other third parties have failed because of a lack of sufficient funds. How will the Federalist Party be different?

We’re opening up to the standard practice of accepting contributions from members. The difference is that we have no intention of making this our primary form of revenue. It’s important to get the ball rolling through investments by those who believe in what we’re doing, but it’s just the start. Over time, we’ll be introducing some other standard practices such as selling Federalist merchandise. More importantly, we’ll be exploring ways to generate revenue by actually earning it. It’s crazy, I know, but there’s no reason why we shouldn’t apply our talents and the talents of members towards the goal of earning revenue just like any business in America.

It’s important to understand that operating the party as a business does not mean we’re operating the party for profit. We will keep overhead low, particularly when it comes to salaries. Nobody employed by the Federalist Party will be getting rich. Once we start assigning salaries (everyone is currently a volunteer, including me), they will be reasonable. Frugality is a virtue that every Federalist Party employee must embrace. Every penny raised will be used to push the national party, state parties, and candidates forward.

For this party to succeed, we need money. This is why we’re not going to go down the same path as any other party. The two major parties use big corporate donations. We will not. In fact, we can make a Constitutional case against accepting money from large corporations since the vast majority of them generate revenue in other countries.

We also won’t go down the path of failure that third parties invariably travel. They spend a good chunk of their time trying to convince big-money donors to give them a chance. It almost never works. This is why they’re all struggling just to get boots on the ground in many states or to run for local elections. They simply can’t afford to run their dream candidate as a sacrificial lamb in the presidential races and still support those running in local races. This is a huge mistake.

If you are interested in learning more about the Federalist Party, visit our website and sign up as a member. If you’re ready to contribute, go straight to the investment page.

Throughout history, our nation has had moments when a brave group of people stood up and made things happen against seemingly insurmountable odds. From the Mayflower to the Revolutionary War to the civil rights movement, people who were tired of the status quo stood up and had their names counted. It took courage, effort, and help from above, but they succeeded. We intend to succeed as well, God willing. Are you willing to help?



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Regarding federal and state powers

James Madison was an enigma to many because he believed in both state and federal powers. He helped to promote ratification of the Constitution to establish a strong national government but he also made certain there were measures in place to empower the states. In many ways, he was the original embodiment of modern Federalism. We’re confident he would be fighting on our side if he were leading the party today.

“The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite.”



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Saturday, May 20, 2017

Focusing on philosophies instead of individuals

One of the basic tenets of small-government-loving Federalists is that the individual American holds primacy over all other levels of government. “Self-government” is what the founders envisioned. They believed that the states and the national government had roles to play, but those roles were intended to empower the individual and his/her family.

This belief has brought about a crossover of ideas that is false. Just because Federalists believe in the power of the individual, that doesn’t mean that Federalists should embrace individuals as the answer in political wars. One of the biggest problems we face is that we’ve developed a culture of followers. In short, we have “idols” who millions of people latch onto in order to not only lead them if elected but also to help them formulate their own opinions.

As an active member of Ted Cruz’s grassroots support, I came across many people who treated Cruz as the guy who could fix things. They viewed him with a reverence that fell just shy of religious zealotry. He’s not the only one who brought this level of support. We’ve seen it with Ron Paul. We witnessed it for eight years with President Obama. We see it today with President Trump. As Americans, it’s imperative that we never put so much weight onto any one person because invariably they will disappoint us.

On the other hand, the conservative and Federalist philosophies are designed to embody the type of allegiance that is all-too-often granted to individuals. Why? Because both philosophies are squarely rooted in the supremacy of the Constitution above all things other than the Bible. As Americans, we are given certain unalienable rights at birth. These rights are natural and God-given. The Constitution doesn’t grant them to us, but it does defend them in ways no individual or party could ever do. It’s for this reason that we should seek leaders who hold defending the Constitution itself as their highest non-religious calling.

We don’t need politicians to defend us or our rights. We need politicians who defend the Constitution. In its words and in the empowerment of its status as the foundation of government, our God-given rights are naturally defended. If our leaders will do everything in their power to defend the Constitution from forces within and abroad (including other American leaders), they will be performing the most important duty in their role as public servants.

Relying on men and women to defend our freedoms will invariably lead to disappointment and failure. If our leaders would simply defend the Constitution, everything else will fall into its appropriate place.



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